The BSEL seminar was held at WLFB 207/208 (2nd floor of Wilfred Brown) at 2:00PM.

A talk from Dr Andrea Capiluppi titled ‘The Relevance of Application Domains in Empirical Findings’ (slides can be found here).

Research on empirical software engineering has increasingly used data from online repositories or collective efforts. The latest trends for researchers is to gather as much data as possible to (i) prevent bias in the representation of a small sample, (ii) work with a sample as close as the population itself, and (iii) showcase the performance of existing or new tools in treating vast amount of data. The effects of harvesting enormous amounts of data have been only marginally considered so far: data could be corrupted; repositories could be forked; and developer identities could be duplicated. In this paper we posit that there is a fundamental flaw in harvesting large amounts of data, and when generalising the conclusions: the application domain, or context, of the analysed systems must be the primary factor for the cluster sampling of FOSS projects. In this talk we analyse a sample of software systems, and using an existing approach based on Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), we derive their application domains. We extract a suite structural OO metrics from each project, and cluster projects by domains: we show that most of the chosen metrics come from different populations, and are based on the application domains.

The BSEL seminar was held at WLFB 207/208 (2nd floor of Wilfred Brown) at 2:00PM.

A talk from Dr Rumyana Neykova titled ‘A Brief History of Types’ (slides can be found here).

Types are one of computing’s most successful concepts, they exist from the oldest to the newest programming languages. Types act as the fundamental unit of compositionality, and play important role in all aspects of software, from design to optimisation. Unfortunately, types are probably the last thing that comes to your mind when you think about distributed systems. In this talk, I will change this misconception. I will (hopefully) convince you that types can be used to understand, test, specify and verify distributed systems. In particular, I will give you a crash course on session types, which were born as types for distributed processes. We will discuss the history of session type, the fundamental meaning of communication, and how to develop distributed systems that we can trust.

The BSEL seminar was held at WLFB 207/208 (2nd floor of Wilfred Brown) at 2:00PM.

A talk from Dr Giuseppe Destefanis titled ‘Software Engineering? Are you kidding me?’ (slides can be found here).

Software development is a complex human process which has, as a final goal, the creation of a complete working application. Software Engineering encompasses all the activities related to software development from conceiving to maintaining the product. Calling software a product, however, highlights all the difficulties of the subject, with “immateriality” being the first one. Engineering is defined as “the branch of science and technology concerned with the design, building, and use of engines, machines, and structures.” (Oxford Dictionary). Is the combination of the two words “Software” and “Engineering” an oxymoron?

Four of Brijeshs’ papers were accepted:

J. Derrick, G. Smith, L. Groves, and B. Dongol. ProCos, chapter A proof method for linearizability on TSO architectures. Springer, 2016. To appear (Accepted 15 April, 2016).

S. Doherty, J. Derrick, B. Dongol, G. Schellhorn, O. Travkin, and H. Wehrheim. Mechanized proofs of opacity: A comparison of two techniques. Formal Aspects of Computing, 2016. Accepted with minor revisions (Mechanisations available here: https://swt.informatik.uni-augsburg.de/swt/projects/Opacity-TML.html).

B. Dongol, I. J. Hayes, and G. Struth. Convolution as a unifying concept: Applications in separation logic, interval calculi and concurrency. ACM Transactions on Computational Logic, 2016.

B. Dongol and L. Groves. Contextual trace refinement for concurrent objects: Safety and progress. In ICFEM, 2016. To appear (previous version http://arxiv.org/abs/1603.01412).

28/04/2016: Robs paper entitled Parallel Algorithms for Testing Finite State Machines: Harmonised State Identifiers and Characterising Sets was published in IEEE Transactions on Computers